Increasing Good Fortune by Writing Names on Prayer Flags

by Khandro Kunzang Raising Prayer Flags is a well-known practice among Himalayan Buddhist cultures. On auspicious days and in sacred holy places, pilgrims will hang strings of prayer flags on mountain tops, between trees, and where there are holy stupas. Monasteries, retreat centers and Dharma centers will hang rows of pole flags around the perimeter … Read more Increasing Good Fortune by Writing Names on Prayer Flags

How T'hroma Practitioners Die

Today we received a phone call from Nepal informing us of the unexpected death of Shiva Lodro Rinpoche. Shiva Rinpoche is the reincarnation of Golok Serta Rinpoche, a great T’hroma Chod practitioner and lineage holder of the T’ho-Luk, or Northern school of Dudjom Lingpa’ s T’hroma Chod – which comes from Degyal Rinpoche. Lama Dawa’s … Read more How T'hroma Practitioners Die

The Prayer Flag Tradition

by Timothy Clark

The prayer flag tradition has a long continuous history dating back to ancient Tibet, China, Persia and India. The tradition has now reached the West and is rapidly gaining popularity. The meanings behind prayer flag texts and symbols, indeed behind the whole idea of prayer flags, are based on the most profound concepts of Tibetan Buddhist philosophy.
The Tibetan word for prayer flag is Dar Cho. “Dar” means to increase life, fortune, health and wealth. “Cho” means all sentient beings. Prayer flags are simple devices that, coupled with the natural energy of the wind, quietly harmonize the environment, impartially increasing happiness and good fortune among all living beings.
prayer flag in SikkimRaising Prayer Flags
Placing prayer flags in and around one’s home or business imparts a feeling of harmony, increases the spiritual atmosphere and brings to mind the teachings of enlightenment. By placing prayer flags outdoors their sacred mantras are imprinted on the wind, generating peace and good wishes.

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Brief Biographies of the Drikung Khandros, Chodrung Zangmo Rinpoche and Sherab Thubten Rinpoche

Chodrung Rinpoche was born into a wealthy family in Northern Tibet in the fire dog year (1886). She was related to His Holiness, Taglung Tsetrul Rinpoche, one of the three throne holders of the Taglung Kagyu lineage. Many auspicious signs accompanied her birth, and she was recognized to be an incarnation of a great dakini. Later, she ran away from an arranged marriage and hid away in the area of Seli-god Tsag (Golden Vulture’s nest) for many years, where she engaged in intensive practice and attained a very high state of realization. She was renowned as the great “Jatang” – one who abandons all worldly activities. She quickly became famous and later returned to her family to give teachings.
Chodrung Rinpoche wandered throughout the region of Northern Tibet, particularly the Nam-tso Ka area. She spent many years in retreat in Taglung Tangpa’s cave, Seligod Tsang, as well as Yeshe Tsogyal’s cave in Drikung Terdrom. She gathered many disciples in the different areas where she stayed, and became the Abbess for the nuns residing at the Drikung Kagyu nunnery in Drikung Terdrom.

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An Historic Description of Awareness Holders of the Great Secret Mantra who are Resplendent in White Clothes and Long Hair

a brief oral commentary by Kyabje Kunzang Dorje Rinpoche

 
Ever since the time of the meeting of the three masters, Khenpo Shatarakshita, Lopon Padmasambhava and the Dharma King, Trison Detsen in 8th century Tibet, there were two divisions of sangha, known as the sangha of monastics with shaven-heads and the saffron robes (rab byung ngur smig gi sde) and the sangha of ngakpas with white clothes and long, plaited hair (gos dkar lcang lo’I sde).
In the upper and lower regions of Kham, these ngakpas are known as ‘amnyes’ (a myes). In the district of Ngari, they are called ‘jopas’ (jo pa) and in provinces such as U and Tsang, they are called ‘ngakchangs’ (sngags ‘chang). In Bhutan, Sikkhim and other bordering kingdoms, these practitioners are known as ‘serkhyimpas.’
The sovereignty of both sanghas was equal during the reign of the Dharma King Trisong Detsen (790-858). This is clearly indicated in historical accounts. Moreover, during the reign of King Ralpachen (813-836), the monarch weaved silk into two ends of his matted hair as a sublime object of offering and requested that both sanghas sit and walk back and forth upon it. This appears in all of the reliable sources of monarchy annals.

Read moreAn Historic Description of Awareness Holders of the Great Secret Mantra who are Resplendent in White Clothes and Long Hair